ARMING THE LUFTWAFFE PDF

Read Count: Flak by Edward B. Westermann Book Resume: Air raid sirens wail, searchlight beams flash across the sky, and the night is aflame with tracer fire and aerial explosions, as Allied bombers and German anti-aircraft units duel in the thundering darkness. Such "cinematic" scenes, played out with increasing frequency as World War II ground to a close, were more than mere stock material for movie melodramas. As Edward Westermann reveals, they point to a key but largely unappreciated aspect of the German war effort that has yet to get its full due.

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Start your review of Arming the Luftwaffe: The German Aviation Industry in World War II Write a review Jun 17, Paul Mcfarland rated it it was amazing This rather short volume Trade Paperback pages took me longer to review than most of the books I comment on, not because it was bad but because it was so informative and thought-provoking.

I kept putting the book down to Google more information on a given aircraft or to just think about what I had read. The author presents a very detailed study of the development and destruction of the German aviation industry during the course of the Second World War.

However, for me at least, he provided This rather short volume Trade Paperback pages took me longer to review than most of the books I comment on, not because it was bad but because it was so informative and thought-provoking.

However, for me at least, he provided a lot of new and somewhat disturbing information. From reading his book I have no problem believing that Hitler was hugely popular during the early part of his reign. The creation of the aircraft industry was a total social change. Along with the new factories came improved housing and new amenities. The socialism part of National Socialism is often overlooked. The second aspect that was of great surprise to me was the use of slave labor in the technical aspects of the aviation industry.

I had always has the image of slave labor being used to clear rubble or to work farms. Not that this was not done, of course, but it was also deeply involved in the fabrication of the latest combat aircraft. These houses of cards that the Nazi empire had constructed begin to fall asunder as the pressure from the allies mounted. There was no longer money, resources, or time for the social perks that had made the industry so popular to the people.

The inherent weaknesses of the use of slave labor begin to show up as well. Quality control because more and more of an issue as the ratio of German overseer to slave worker fell due to the needs of the war and the impact of the allied bombing. In the closing part of the book the author traces the concept, design, development, and production of the light jet fighter the HE He uses this as an excellent example of the weakness of the system and the failure of the industry to play its part.

However, there are more about Luftwaffe than merely pilots. This book addresses the Luftwaffe industry with an emphasis on production. It concured that despite of heavy allied strategic bombing, in mid, Luftwaffe production reached its peak. Contributing factors include slave labor and rationalization of production that Luftwaffe was once a sacred symbol to me that dignified discipline, courage, honor, integrity and brilliance of the well-known German pilots, such as Erich Hartmann.

Contributing factors include slave labor and rationalization of production that gave production priority to the aviation industry. Yet, such surge in product yielded little effect on the war due to severe shortage of synthetic aviation fuel and well-trained pilots, and it could only be seen as a desperate and futile struggle by the Third Reich. I highly recommend this book to WWII fans.

Such attacks were disastrous to the German military especially Luftwaffe and Panzer troops.

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Arming the Luftwaffe

After the defeat of Germany, the service was dissolved on 8 May under the conditions of the Treaty of Versailles , which also mandated the destruction of all German military aircraft. Since the Treaty of Versailles forbade Germany to have an air force, German pilots trained in secret. To train its pilots on the latest combat aircraft, Germany solicited the help of the Soviet Union , which was also isolated in Europe. A secret training airfield was established at Lipetsk in and operated for approximately nine years using mostly Dutch and Soviet, but also some German, training aircraft before being closed in This base was officially known as 4th squadron of the 40th wing of the Red Army.

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